Some Noise Tube Renders

Noise Tube Progress Render+ View hi-res on Flickr.

Some progress has occurred. C++ is becoming clearer. Here’s what progressed in the first couple images:

  1. I created a Tween class for animating values. It’s modeled after CASA Lib’s Tween class. I’ll probably be releasing it to the community soon.
  2. I hooked up my MIDI controllers to the piece, so I could have more control over tweaking values. I’m using a great add-on for openFrameworks called ofxMIDI.
  3. Along the way, I learned how to implement openFrameworks event dispatchers and listeners. (Hint: search for “poco events” in the openFrameworks Wiki if you want to learn how.)

In doing all this, I was able to trigger light movements with a MIDI controller. I used my M-Audio Trigger Finger’s velocity-sensitive pads to animate two lights. Hard tap = fast movement.

Noise Tube Progress Render+ View hi-res on Flickr.

Here’s a video of the animated lights in action. Please excuse the stutters; while this does run at 30fps in realtime, SnapzPro isn’t able to keep up because of the CPU usage of the piece.

Now after all this, I came to realize that I really wanted to be able to loop the Perlin noise that was creating the height map of the tube. Because, though you can’t see it, there’s an awful seam on the side facing away from the camera. By looping the noise, I could reliably look at it from all angles.

After some research, I came across a great library called libnoise. Took me a little while to get it to compile, only to realize that while it did the job, it dropped my framerate from a respectable 45fps to 9fps. Definitely not suitable for realtime noise generation.

So I went back to the fastest Perlin noise generator I could find (this class from John Ratcliff), and I decided to live with the seam in the back.

Amidst all this, I also stumbled upon this awesome blog post about Twisted Architecture. I thought it would be cool to implement something like that in my piece. So I did. But then I forgot about it.

It was only when I started twisting the “twist-associated” knob on my MIDI controller that the damn seam actually came to life. So, you can see how it starts to play out in the rest of the images here:

Noise Tube Progress Render+ View hi-res on Flickr.

Noise Tube Progress Render+ View hi-res on Flickr.

Noise Tube Progress Render+ View hi-res on Flickr.

Noise Tube Progress Render+ View hi-res on Flickr.

Also, in those last couple renders, I added a convex mesh to the background so that I could start incorporating background colors properly. Moreover, so I could get some light-generated gradients happening. More to come… more to come.